Your Guide to Natural Healing

The Sleep-Gut Connection


Physician Reference
Product Guide
Donate to keep this site alive
Wellness Events

Alternative Medicine:
A Comparison

FDA World: 1965-2008
A tiny peek into the mind of the FDA

Can Environment Affect Your Health?

Vaccines: The Whole Truth And Nothing But

What is Your Prescription Medication Doing To You?

Timing Increases Effects of Supplements, Drugs and Surgery

The Brain-Gut Connection

Minerals and Their Function

Check Your Digestion

Who is Angel?



This is a sequel to the Brain-Gut Connection that explains the vagus nerve and the circuitry connecting our two brains. 


The Sleep-Gut Connection

As light is shed on the circuitry between the two brains, researchers are beginning to understand why people act and feel the way they do. The brain and gut are so much alike that during our sleeping hours, both have natural 90-minute cycles. For the brain, this slow wave sleep is interrupted by periods of rapid eye movement sleep in which dreams occur. For the gut, the 90-minute cycles also involve slow waves of muscle contractions but, as with REM intervals, these are punctuated by short bursts of rapid muscle movement. Could it be that both brains influence each other? The answer is probably yes. REM sleep is a sleep phase characterized by arousal, altered activity of the autonomic nervous system and altered colon (large intestine) function.

We also know that patients with bowel problems tend to have abnormal REM sleep. Poor sleep has been reported by many perhaps a majority of, patients with irritable bowel syndrome (lBS) and non-ulcerative dyspepsia (also known as "sour stomach") who complain of awakening tired and unrefreshed in the morning. Even after patients awake from what they describe as a "sound sleep," they report a general feeling of tiredness and fatigue.

Abnormal REM sleep is reduced by low-dose treatment with the anti-depressant amitryptiline, which has also been shown to be effective in treating lBS and non-ulcerative dyspepsia. Many drugs designed to affect the brain also affect the gut. For example, the gut is loaded with the neurotransmitter serotonin. In fact, more serotonin is produced there than anywhere else in the body. Serotonin is linked with initiation of peristalsis.

Notes taken from, Patient Heal Thyself  by Jordan S. Rubin, NMD, CNC


For more interesting articles, click here for free access
to your guide to hard-to-find wellness information for obscure and difficult health conditions.


Health and Wellness Through Education